La prostituta y la madre: El contrapunto femenino de ¡madre!

En la filmografía de Darren Aronofsky, sobre todo en sus últimas películas, existen dos constantes que permean sus narrativas: la presencia constante de una iconografía y alegoría religiosa  en sus historias y la tremenda necesidad de llevar a sus personajes femeninos al extremo de una crisis nerviosa; por supuesto que ¡madre! no es la excepción.

Antes de comenzar, quiero hacer una aclaración, debido a que ningún personaje tiene nombre en el filme, haré mención de cada uno de ellos por medio de los actores que los interpretan y de los estereotipos que representan, de esta forma no habrá confusiones y podré seguir un hilo argumentativo mucho más claro.

A mi manera de verlo, uno de los grandes aciertos de Aronofsky con esta película, es la de su representación de la figura femenina como  aquella persona dividida, y fracturada, entre dos fantasías estereotípicas que son producto de la perspectiva masculina: la madre y la prostituta.

En ¡madre! los personajes femeninos relevantes son interpretados por Michelle Pfeiffer y Jennifer Lawrence. Ambas son caracterizadas como meros estereotipos bíblicos: la primera figura como la prostituta que representa el deseo y la lujuria provocadora del hombre para hacer cosas atroces y, la segunda, como la madre que sacrifica su vida y entrega todo por su familia.

Sobra decir que éstas son alegorías directas de figuras religiosas y bíblicas. Eva (o la prostituta) es aquella mujer que cayó ante la tentación del fruto prohibido y se convirtió en la personificación del deseo, y a la Madonna (y hasta cierto punto, la Madre Naturaleza) aquella mujer que se entrega sin condición a la maternidad y a la atención y dedicación por otros.

Estos estereotipos han funcionado como contrapunto del otro desde el inicio de los tiempos. Desde la perspectiva masculina  una mujer puede debe ser un objeto de deseo y lujuria primero y una madre dadivosa y entregada después. Así, estos personajes son retratados como recipientes donde los máximos deseos y anhelos de los hombres son depositados, no como personas completas.

Tanto Pfeiffer como Lawrence son personajes que son definidos por sus esposos, interpretados en la película por Ed Harris y Javier Bardem. Ambos son hombres egoístas que no están interesados en escuchar la opinión de sus esposas y que constantemente las minimizan con afán de arrebatarles su agencia. No son más que imágenes borrosas que pertenecen a la fantasía de un hombre, no a una realidad palpable.

Son ideales  masculinos de lo que una mujer debe o no debe ser ante una sociedad y, por lo tanto, son figuras que no deben convivir en el mismo espacio ni deben de compartir características similares. La mujer debe ser, primero, una prostituta en lo privado, en la cama, en la recámara y, después, debe ser una madre en lo público, ante la mirada de la comunidad, ante los ojos de su esposo. Después de todo, ese es su fin último en la vida.

En el filme, ambas son articuladas como antagonistas, como personas que no tienen la capacidad de convivir bajo el mismo techo y a las cuales les resulta imposible compartir algo. La prostituta llega a crear caos a la casa de la madre mientras que la madre se siente amenazada por las actitudes pecaminosas de la prostituta.

La prostituta representa todo lo que intimida a la figura de la madre, es segura de si misma, es provocadora, dice lo que piensa y no tiene problema con habla e, incluso, mostrar, sus momentos de privacidad sexual con su esposo.  La madre, por otro lado, es callada, sumisa y solo piensa en complacer a sus esposo y sus pedimentos.

La prostituta es la que sugiere la idea de embarazarse y la que invita a la madre a vivir su sexualidad con libertad, a no detenerse, a convencer a su esposo de la idea. La prostituta es la tentación y la madre es la incubadora de la pasión.

Michelle Pfeiffer se encuentra presente en todo el primer acto de la película en la que el personaje de Jennifer Lawrence quiere convertirse en madre y desaparece justo cuando se entera que está embarazada. Más explícito no podría ser.

Quizás es cierto que  Darren Aronofsky buscaba retratar los peligros de la sobrepoblación y la explotación ambiental con su filme , sin embargo, también es importante hacer notar que, haya sido su propósito o no, logró con esta película representar de una forma innovadora la ambivalencia social que se espera de la mujer hoy en día.

When fame gets in the way of love: a musical tragedy.

It seems that love and fame are difficult —or even impossible— to get along with. At least that’s what some movies, particularly musicals, have been trying to explain us all along. In their worlds, failed artists are meant to find love only by sacrificing their passions.

Nowadays, films’ stance on the artists’ love life is like this: you either are very lucky to find the love of your life and spend what’s left of your days to devote yourself to his or her hapiness, or you succeed on achieving your dreams by following the path you are always meant to walk. You have to choose, you can’t have both.

There’s no better way to illustrate this than with Jason Robert Brown’s  The Last Five Years, adapted to film by Richard LaGravenese, and Damien Chazelle’s Lala Land. Movies where their protagonists   —all artists, by the way — have to face the tough decision of living a fameless life by staying together or embracing the success that is coming their way, but only by themselves.

In The Last Five Years’ movie adaptation, Cathy (Anna Kendrick) is a musical theater performer who is looking for an opportunity that can finally take her out of her waitress job. Jamie (Jeremy Jordan), on the other hand, is a writer looking for a publishing house who would want his book.

In Lala Land, Mia (Emma Stone) is an actress who is looking for an opportunity that can finally take her out of her barista job. Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) is a jazz lover who wants to open his own club where he can play his own music.

They all have dreams to fullfill and places to be, but life — and love, at some extent— eventually gets in their way.  Both couples fight to stay with each other along the way, but success, as we will learn, is a tricky thing to achieve and it does not wait for anyone or anything.

What’s really enlighting about contrasting these two movies is that we have the possibility to understand how two directors can represent different scenarios, and perspectives, of the same problem: the one with the couple that begin to have problems as soon as one of them becames famous, and the other couple that strengthens themselves by supporting each others dreams but fell off the wagon half way anyway.

Whilst Jamie succesfully manages to sell his first book to a famous publishing house right after he starts dating Cathy, she is not getting callbacks at all. In fact, she is just stuck between her job as a waitress and her summer gig in Ohio. She is happy for him but, as he becomes more and more famous, she starts to feel more like a failure. She doesn’t want to be the one that’s left behind.

There’s more than the eye could see with their relationship’s problems, Jamie’s success in no way feels like a threat to Cathy, but rather a constant reminder of her failure and her impossibility to follow and achieve her dreams. Cathy’s insecurities stems from society’s need to validate women by their hability to carry along with their household activities they’re supposed to do, instead of accomplishing their goals.

Their real problem, though, is their unwilingness to communicate with each other. They are really afraid to let the other down, because they really love each other. And when they actually communicate, their only purpose is to hurt themselves.

Cathy and Jamie, in fact,  sing to express themselves. They use music to express their deepest and inner thoughts, and to reflect their expectations, like a daydreaming blowoff valve.  She wants to be independent, succesful and in love, but, at the same time, he wants to be a good provider, a succesfull writer and a charming womanizer.

Mia and Sebastian’s relationship functions the other way around. Both of them are unsuccessful and very lonely when they actually start dating. What’s really great of their relationship is the support and motivation they have with each other. Neither one of them want to see the other one fail, on the contrary, they want them to be happy and fulfilled people.

It’s really their inhability to feel empathy for one another what pushes them to break up. While Mia is incapable to believe that Sebastian would do anything to follow his dream —even if this means to play on a mainstream band and touring— he is clueless about her weariness and constant disappointment that all her failed auditions make her feel.

In the end, they all are idealists, and it’s really interesting to understand that the one thing these four people share, apart from their desire to be famous, is the way they grapple their lives by putting all their expectations before reality. They want to be in an ideal relationship, one where empathy and communication are something to be expected from your loved one.

As we can see, all of the four characters  are always constrained and forced by themselves to live between two worlds: first and foremost, on a fantasy land where they can have it all, and, later, on the real world, where love and fame can’t get along.

In fact, one of these musicals strenghts is their capability to toy with their narrative in order to show their portagonists’ life expectations by using different formats to evidence the stark constrasts between their titular couples real lives’ and their fantasy worlds.

In these movies, achievement and happiness are related with a fantasy/dream world  were their expectations are fulfilled, whilst failure and disappointment are paired with the real world. Both LaGravenese and Chazelle even depict these particular moments with different colors and shades along their stories; whereas the blue and gray filters are in charge of showing failure, the yellow and white ones are destined to bathe the screen with color when an achievement is made.

There’s certainly something tragic behind this argument. This is a world  where idealists are bound to always be normed and constrained by their expectations if they want to follow their path towards success. Even if this means to sacrifice love in their lives.

Supergirl y la deconstrucción del estereotipo de la madre

Como lo he mencionado anteriormente, la representación de la figura materna en el cine y la televisión ha sido casi siempre relegada, y desplazada, a ser aquella mujer entregada a su familia y que no es capaz de entender su existencia como mujer separada de su posibilidad de ser madre. Para la sociedad que se refleja en estas historias, ser madre es la característica por antonomasia de la mujer.

Actualmente, pocas series han intentado (de)construir esta representación tanto como lo ha hecho Supergirl. Desde sus inicios, este programa ha retratado a sus personajes femeninos como mujeres fuertes, decididas, ambiciosas, libres y seguras de si mismas. Individuos capaces de tener una relación fuerte con otras mujeres sin necesidad de sentirse amenazadas.

En el universo de Supergirl las mujeres son mucho más que simples incubadoras de bebés; son líderes de compañías multinacionales, agentes encubiertos que trabajan para departamentos importantes del gobierno, reporteras incansables que siempre están en busca de la verdad, empresarias exitosas, reinas de civilizaciones, científicas que se preocupan por el medio ambiente y, por supuesto, superheroínas.

Lo que diferencia a estas mujeres del resto de las que existen en los programas de televisión actuales, es que algunas de ellas son también madres.  Las matriarcas de dicha serie no son reducidas ni relegadas debido a  su maternidad, al contrario, la maternidad no hace otra cosa que fortalecerlas. Ésta no se configura como su único rasgo identitario, sino que forma parte, más bien, de una serie de características y atributos que la constituyen como un ser humano completo.

De hecho la segunda temporada nos regala no sólo a una, sino a dos madres que figuran como la mayor amenaza de Supergirl: Lillian Luthor (Brenda Strong)  y Rhea (Teri Hatcher). Lillian es una científica, y fundadora del proyecto Cadmus, dispuesta a hacer todo por tratar de frenar la afluente — y a sus ojos, peligrosa—migración de extraterrestres a la tierra; también es la madre de Lex y Lena Luthor. Rhea, por otro lado, es la reina de los Daxamites, una civilización extraterrestre en constante batalla con los Kryptonian (la sociedad de donde proviene Kara ); también es la mamá de Mon-El, la pareja sentimental de Supergirl.

Ambas mujeres son líderes poderosas que están dispuestas a hacer todo para lograr sus metas, incluso manipular y chantajear a sus hijos de ser necesario. Mientras los planes de Lillian siempre involucran métodos peligrosos, y posiblemente terroristas, para deshacerse de los extraterrestres ilegales viviendo en la tierra, Rhea es capaz de cometer asesinatos en nombre de su civilización y con el fin de conquistar el planeta tierra.

Lo más interesante de estas dos figuras femeninas es que representan a la antítesis del estereotipo materno; las dos usan a sus hijos como medios para lograr sus planes y que, en caso de encontrarse en una situación de peligro, son capaces de deshacerse de ellos para salvarse así mismas. Tanto Lillian como Rhea apelan a su lado materno solo cuando necesitan verse más humanas y vulnerables frente a sus enemigos.

Con estos personajes los creadores de la serie logran subvertir por completo el estereotipo desgastado de la madre que hemos visto una y otra vez. Cada una usa su vulnerabilidad como fortaleza y respuesta ante una amenaza,  mientras que la a abnegación y entrega incondicional que se espera de ellas no es más que un obstáculo en medio de su camino.

Esta deconstrucción nos permite enfrentarnos a las ideas preconcebidas del imaginario de madre que reproducimos una y  y otra vez dentro de la sociedad.  Una mujer puede ser madre y una líder capaz de guiar un movimiento.  De la misma forma, también  puede elegir ser madre y dedicarse a ello de tiempo completo, cualquier alternativa es válida mientras exista la opción de tomar la decisión.

Lillian y Rhea no son solo madres, son mujeres poderosas que deciden separarse de la idea de maternidad  que la sociedad se aferra en establecer como aquella característica intrínseca de identidad que, en otra serie o situación, podría describirlas y reducirlas por completo.

Si hay algo que he aprendido de esta serie es que ser madre no es una obligación, es una decisión que cada mujer debería poder tomar con libertad, sin sentirse culpables y  sin necesidad de estar comprometidas a serlo,  solo por el simple hecho de tener un útero.

 

 

Rachel Bloom: musical comedy and spot on feminism

The day I fell in love with Rachel Bloom was actually the first time I ever heard anything from and about her. I was just  in the process of getting over my ex-boyfriend, so, naturally, I was looking for new music for my sad “I’m-over-you-and-I’m-not-sad-at-all” playlist to listen to on an infinite loop. I ran out of options quickly so, as any other lonely guy would do, I searched for songs with the word “dick” on their name and, without realizing, I was rapidly blasting “Pictures Of Your Dick”, by the one and only Rachel Bloom, non-stop. Little did I know that finding this merry tune will be just the tip of the iceberg on my quest to understand and embrace the numerous ways she navigates with her comedy.

For those who hadn’t had the joy of knowing Rachel Bloom, let me break it down for you. She is a comedian who started her career by doing musical comedy on Youtube (Please, don’t miss the opportunity to go to her channel to take a look of what’s she’s capable of) and now she’s the creator, writer and protagonist of The CW’s Crazy Ex-Girlfriend TV show, which recently was renewed for a third season.

She is a feminist who uses musical comedy to make a point and to take a stand on what she really believes in. So, in order to understand her comedy, you will need to see it as a criticism and a satire of the society’s actual state.

The clever ways she  balances her feminism in perfect unison with her comedy is, actually, her greatest statement of all; in fact, Rachel Bloom’s best asset is her particular way she uses the deconstruction of tropes, and social constructs, as strong arguments against sexism. Traditional gender roles and moral values are just some of the topics she likes to toy with on a daily basis.

Rachel Bloom sees society as a one big musical. A staging where the performers live by the narratives they taught themselves to believe in in order to follow the rules the script has laid upon them. A play where some tropes could be just as harmful as labels, but that can also be subverted in the same way.

You will only need to take one glimpse on her trajectory to find three subverted tropes that are present consistently on all the things she does: The Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, The Disney Princess and The Party Girl. Her most famous yet is, and thanks to her TV show, the Crazy Ex-Girlfriend.

This particular trope is pretty complex by itself, not only because it comes from a blatant sexist background, but because women are often labeled with it. You might have heard about this one before, it stems from the outdated idea that women are just emotional individuals that keep making rushed choices with their heart and not with their minds. So, by acting on it, they will always be reduced to this one-note characters that will probably be obsessed with the dudes they had a relationship with.

Rachel Bloom, on the other hand, makes the most of it by really going along with it. She constantly mocks this particular trope by going the extra mile by granting all these particular characteristics to her main character of the show, Rebecca Bunch (played, obviously, by her): she basically moves to her ex-boyfriend’s hometown in order to get back with him, but she’s convinced that that’s not the reason she changed cities.

Rebecca is obsessive, irrational and stubborn. She’s the best caricature of the trope we can get. That’s what’s really enthralling of the show, her character is so exaggerated and over the top that it becomes really easy to deconstruct it in order to identify the flaws behind it. That’s how Rachel Bloom rolls, by exaggerating the stereotype and waiting for the cracks to show.

Her Crazy Ex-Girlfriends are often saying to themselves, and to others, what men would like to hear in order to get back with them, after all, they are hopelessly in love and  very devoted to the man they love. It’s common that they have a really low self-esteem and their personality, and core identity, varies from man to man. They even upload pictures of their ex-boyfriend’s dick online as a form of personal vendetta.

With only two seasons of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend in, we are able to understand, as the audience, that women that are labeled as the Crazy Ex-Girlfriend are, in fact, often constrained by all the high and sexist standards that society have placed on them from the very beginning.  In a certain way, they just acts on it.

Women have to be sentimental — and not tough—, because the gender role they have to fulfill demands them to be like that, but only in small doses and without being too loud, because, without any kind of supervision, it could probably transform into an obsession or, even worst, a direct attack against our very fragile masculinity.

The Disney Princess trope comes right from the same place. Society will always tell us that, in order to have a happy life, women have to become wives, not Crazy Ex-Girlfriends,  and the best way to do it is by drawing the attention of a Prince Charming by being feminine, elegant, selfless and sentimental. That’s why Rachel Bloom’s subversion of this trope is so delicious. Her Princesses are everything but what society likes to call “ladylike”. They like to curse while their sing, and they will certainly talk about poop and menstrual cramps without any decorum. They are, at the end of the day, regular human beings, not impossible standards to achieve.

The Party Girl has her origins on the darkest corner of masculine heterosexuality: the fantasies. This stereotype wants women to be sexy, sensual and carefree but without losing any trace of femininity and elegance. This particular trope can be very contradictory by itself, it asks women to be kind of slutty but without losing her prstine image or any respect from the others, especially from herself. You can also find this girl in any party waiting to woo over some random dudes.

In Rachel Bloom’s world, the Party Girl sings at the club about dying from cancer, throwing up a bile, threatening someone’s girlfriend to kill her and use her skin as a dress, or even flying her dirty panties as a kite, all of that whilst using a revealing outfit. As you can see, she’s anything but sexy.

This is what we really need right now, someone who is willing to use her platform to make strong statements about important topics visible,  with creative methods that can help people understand them in a more accesible way. Rachel Bloom is already getting ahead of everybody.

Big Little Lies, 13 Reasons Why y Sweet/Vicious: La voz de las víctimas de la violencia de género

La violencia de género es y sigue siendo un problema que nos sigue afectando a todos y a todas. Tan solo con ver que en 2016 se registraron 29,725 averiguaciones y carpetas de investigación por delitos sexuales en México, esto significa que, en promedio, en ese año, cada 24 horas se denunciaron 81 nuevos casos de violencia sexual, es decir, entre 3 y 4 violaciones o abusos sexuales por hora. Actualmente, siete mujeres son asesinadas al día en México y hace poco, a una chica que murió en un accidente vial se le tachaba de puta por subirse a un carro de un hombre desconocido sin que su esposo la estuviera acompañando.

Como sociedad estamos muy acostumbrados a enterarnos de hechos como estos —o incluso presenciar actos de abuso sexual— sin inmutarnos, ni hacer nada al respecto. Es por eso que es de vital importancia hablar sobre ello, mantenernos informados y no quitar el dedo del renglón. Hay una línea muy delgada que separa a la normalización de la violencia de género de la visibilización de la misma y todos los días, como sociedad, estamos dispuestos a cruzarla.

Como lo he comentado anteriormente, la representación es importante y si hay algo que (la mayoría de) los programas de televisión han logrado hacer estos últimos años es, precisamente, contar historias y narrativas que visibilicen no sólo a problemas como estos, sino la razón detrás de ellos. A final de cuentas, es siempre el contexto el que nos delimita y posiciona frente a lo que buscamos entender.

Shows como Big Little Lies , 13 Reasons Why Sweet/Vicious son producto y resultado directo de la cultura de la violencia de género que es tan próspera en nuestra sociedad actual. En ellas, se representan a las relaciones de poder unilaterales como aquella causa inherente de la violencia de género gracias a una variedad de historias protagonizadas por mujeres que son violentadas, sometidas a situaciones de abuso y llevadas al límite.

Las relaciones de poder, y la enorme influencia que puede tener una persona sobre la voluntad de otra, es la idea central que rige las historias y los arcos principales de las mismas. Gracias a la representación tan detallada del proceso complicado que dos personas atraviesan para formar una relación de poder, y el intercambio simbólico que esto conlleva, se logra la visibilización de un problema normalizado.

Lo que en cualquier otro tipo de serie pudo haber sido aprovechado como un momento perfecto para hacer uso del shock value, en estos programas de televisión es tratado a fondo, representando con suma claridad una variedad de temáticas que muy pocas series se han atrevido a tocar, como las consecuencias del abuso sexual, las razones detrás del acoso, los alcances de la sociedad misógina y las repercusiones de la normalización de la violencia de género.

En Big Little Lies, Celeste Wright (Nicole Kidman) vive una relación de abuso con su esposo Perry (Alexander Skarsgard), donde la pasión que sienten el uno por el otro los mantiene unidos pero, al mismo tiempo, es siempre el origen de un maltrato físico y emocional que él le ocasiona a ella. La serie no toma reparo en mostrar, a lo largo de sus ocho capítulos, los actos violentos por los que ella tiene que pasar. Con cada grito y cada golpe, Celeste se asegura así misma que Perry no le inflige dolor a propósito, que es algo que él no puede controlar y que ella está ahí para apoyarlo. Ella sabe que vive en una relación de abuso y que, por el bien de sus hijos, debería alejarse de su esposo, sin embargo, no puede olvidar todo lo que su esposo significa para ella.

En el mismo programa aparece Jane Chapman (Shailene Woodley), una chica que decide mudarse de ciudad para comenzar de nuevo y, de paso, buscar al hombre desconocido que la violó unos años atrás y que también es padre de su hijo. A lo largo de los 8 capítulos podemos ver, a través de sus ojos, lo que es vivir después de haber sobrevivido a un acto de violencia de género. Jane tiene pesadillas y se encuentra en un estado de pánico constante a consecuencia de ello. La vida de Jane ya no es de ella después de aquel acto violento.

Lo que estos shows nos ayudan a entender es que los casos de abuso sexual no son situaciones ni momentos aislados que suceden de la nada; ni mucho menos son causados por la víctima. Al contrario, se trata más bien de la culminación de una cadena de sucesos agresivos, infligidos por una persona o grupos de personas, que son normalizados con naturaleza por una sociedad donde la violencia de género es parte del día a día.

Hannah Baker (Katherine Langford) es una adolescente que tiene que soportar las acciones escabrosas detrás de la cultura misógina en la que vive en 13 Reasons Why. Este programa de Netflix aprovecha los beneficios del binge-watching, que su plataforma facilita, para representar con lujo de detalle los procesos involucrados en la cultura normalizada de la violencia de género. Desde su perspectiva podemos entender cómo las mujeres son cosificadas desde la adolescencia y, por ello, se convierten instantáneamente en un objetivo fácil para aquellos que deciden que, por el simple hecho de ser mujeres, sus cuerpos le pertenecen a los hombres y tienen el derecho de hacer con ellos lo que quieran. Hannah es violada días después de que le sucede lo mismo a su mejor amiga Jessica, por su compañero de clases con el pretexto de que ellas nunca se negaron.

Jules Thomas (Eliza Bennett), al igual que Celeste, Hannah, Jessica y Jane, es una sobreviviente de un abuso sexual perpetrado por el novio de su mejor amiga mientras ella estaba inconsciente en Sweet/Vicious. El giro de esta serie radica en el posicionamiento de Jules como una vigilante que busca venganza al golpear a hombres acusados de violencia sexual. El show no solo se encarga de darle voz a una víctima, sino que también le da agencia y autonomía al proporcionarle los medios para pelear en contra de la misma sociedad que permitió a su agresor aprovecharse de ella.

La existencia de estas series importa mucho. Estos son programas que colocan a las víctimas de abuso sexual como personas con voz, agencia y autonomía, son shows que no se detienen a la hora de confrontar al espectador con escenas de agresión sexual y que no solo ayudan a entender los alcances que tiene la violencia de género en nuestro día a día, sino que también nos permiten identificarlos en nosotros mismos y en los demás.

 

Un espacio para la desnudez.