Archivo de la categoría: Hablemos Seriamenta

Honey, I shoehorned heterosexuality on the kids

Let’s all agree on this, the media doesn’t like to portray queer children. We can have lots of wonderful and nuanced gay couples flourishing in front of our eyes accompanied with some transgender characters in our TV shows, but don’t even think about getting a beautiful coming out story of a child with an identity crisis, because kids watching it might “get confused” and ask things we’re not prepared to answer as the grown-ass adults we are.

We don’t like to confront the things we’re not able—or don’t want—to understand. That’s why most of the audiences, especially parents, get usually startled when even a hint of queerness stands out on their children’s TV shows because talking about it will automatically imply we want our children to be themselves and live a full life instead of living within the borders of the idea of life we have for them.

We like to see our children depicted as five-year-old heterosexual boys holding hands with five-year-old heterosexual girls yearning for long-lasting relationships since the first day they were born and dreaming with being home-steady moms and dads who provide for their families. Basically, the perfect family picture.

And don’t get me wrong, there’s nothing bad with wanting to have the family, the house, the children and the dog visualized in the future. The problem here is that the media is not capable to look beyond that stereotype, especially when our reality is really different and far from it. Every day, there are more and more queer children embracing their identities and feeling good about themselves than we can handle, and that scares us.

That’s why most TV shows, especially the ones that have a younger audience, prefer to depict their children as heterosexuals —especially men— from the very beginning. In fact, they would probably establish them as such on the first or second episode of the season to leave no doubts about it.

We can’t have a little boy on television who is sensitive and caring without clarifying upfront his heterosexuality. We also can’t have a child who doesn’t have a romantic interest (or even intentions of having one) without giving them one immediately, because being single would probably mean that they’re indecisive or gay. Sadly, that’s a direct reflection of our reality and the ways we reduce children’s identity.

Nowadays, is really easy to find stories of little boys falling in love with little girls —and not the other way around— from a very young age in TV shows, as opposed on investing in creating meaningful stories that centre on them being alone and discovering themselves; that would leave no space to believe that they are nothing but heterosexuals. People actually prefer to create a love arc between their little heterosexual children before considering the idea of, I don’t know, letting them be children.

There isn’t a better example of this than the characters of Jackson (Michael Campion) and Max (Elias Harger) from Netflix’s Fuller House (2016): a pair of thirteen-year-old and seven-year-old boys respectively, who have been problematically paired up with several girls since episode one of their three-season run, with lots of excuses, narratively-wise, to justify this.

Jackson has been portrayed, from the very beginning, as a teenager experiencing his wonderful blossoming into manhood, and as such, he has been doing it with the help of his manliness. The problem with it is that his character is constantly reduced to his heterosexuality and his “manly appeal”, making it his only recognizable trait. Jackson’s arcs have always been about him trying to make girls like him. If we strip him out of it, there would nothing left of him, leaving behind a blank of a person.

Max’s heterosexuality, on the other hand, is so frustratingly shoehorned, that any story −and believe me, there are lots of them−that develops around him and his love life automatically feels superficial and out of character. Why? Because he is portrayed as a sensitive child that is in touch with his emotions and, as we have learned, emotions and sensitiveness are not usually related to manliness and heterosexuality in boys.

The people behind the show is so invested in proving that Max is heterosexual that they have essentially devoted all of the entirety of his season 2 and season 3 arc into orchestrating a feud between him and his neighbour over the love and attention of a girl, named Rose (Mckenna Grace), —who’s title actress looks always uncomfortable— in order to become her boyfriend. It’s important to mention that none of them has asked her if she would like to date them or even if she’s interested in any of them.

Something similar has been happening on another Netflix show, Stranger Things (2016), where it seems that the love lives of a group of thirteen-year-old boys are more interesting than the mysteries surrounding them. Or at least, that’s what the creators of the show, the Duffer brothers, have been trying to tell us on the two seasons that have been aired.

First, they stripped Eleven (Millie Bobby Brown) of all agency by giving her the role of Mike’s (Finn Wolfhard) love interest on season 1’s finale, then, they brought a new girl character, called Max (Sadie Sink) to fulfil the role of the Smurfette of their group that Eleven left when she was gone, and with no other reason to exist than becoming Lucas (Caleb Maclaughlin) and Dustin’s (Gaten Matarazzo) love interest and object of desire.

Also, like Fuller House, Stranger Things has their very own Max problem with one of their leads, Will (Noah Schnapp), who is also a sensitive, caring boy who also happens to be in touch of his feelings and the only one who has not being paired with any other girl. But, as he becomes more and more important, I can already see him meeting a love interest for season 3, especially because lots of media outlets and forums devoted to the show have been asking to the creators to have him be a gay character.

What’s really dangerous—and also disingenuous, I might say— about the narrative that the creators of these shows are trying to tell, is first, that girls’ only purpose in this world is to become a symbol of heterosexuality for adults to use as love interests in order to justify the heterosexuality of their boys and, second, that children need to be paired up before they have the chance to even try to think about themselves, their identities and what they really want.

Representation will always matter, especially when it comes to children and their identities, if we want to set a good example, we need to depict them as to how they really are and not by the idea we have of them.

 

 

 

 

 

Tenemos un problema de perspectiva en Hollywood.

Es un hecho, Hollywood sigue siendo una máquina fílmica sexista que le interesa poco el punto de vista femenino detrás de sus películas y que, cuando sucede lo contrario, le da la espalda a las directoras y realizadoras al momento de reconocer su trabajo.

Aún cuando miles y millones  de veces se ha intentado mostrar y demostrar la importancia de la perspectiva femenina en el cine actual, el punto de vista masculino sigue siendo el imperativo en el mundo de las películas, tanto delante como detrás de cámaras.

Esto no es más que resultado directo de la sociedad en la que vivimos, donde la perspectiva masculina es la hegemónica y donde las experiencias de vida, así como los relatos e historias, son tomadas en cuenta desde el punto de vista masculino.

Con ello, no quiero decir que contar con una mirada masculina detrás de un proyecto es algo necesariamente negativo, sino que, más bien, el exceso de perspectivas similares no solo acapara y monopoliza el discurso, sino que propicia , voluntaria o involuntariamente, que el resto de miradas se pierdan en el camino.

El problema, entonces, radica en la unilateralidad de visiones. Todos los días nos enfrentamos a un mundo donde las historias que vemos y consumimos a diario son vistas con el mismo lente, y contadas con la misma voz. Un mundo donde la falta de representación femenina nos condiciona a creer que la realidad y la perspectiva deben ser alineadas con y hacia lo masculino.

La incidencia masculina hegemónica en la creación de películas influye al discurso fílmico, en gran manera, de diferentes formas y con una enorme variedad de aristas, donde la dirección, el guión, la producción e incluso la actuación se ven afectadas.

En el caso de la dirección, el punto de vista masculino es tan permanente y recalcitrante que incluso existe un término (a veces derogativo) para nombrar a la perspectiva (casi siempre) sexista detrás de la cámara masculina: The male gaze. 

The male gaze se puede identificar de diversas formas en una película: en el vestuario que usan los personajes femeninos, en la forma que la cámara encuadra y decide enfocar a los cuerpos femeninos o, incluso, en las actuaciones reductivas de los personajes femeninos.

El mejor, y más actual, ejemplo de ello puede ilustrarse de manera clara en la modificación de la armadura de pelea que usan las Amazonas en Wonder Woman, dirigida por Patty Jenkins, y los bikinis ajustados que usan en Justice League de Zach Snyder. Misma película donde el trasero de Diana Prince es protagonista de una cantidad exhorbitante de tomas.

La dirección de un filme no es la única víctima de la mirada hegemónica masculina, el guión también lo es. Debido a que la escritura corresponde a la espina dorsal de una historia, es común encontrar una representación errónea y superficial de personajes femeninos. Una película que no tiene voces femeninas que cuenten historias diferentes, solo propicia la creación de tropes* reductivos y personajes sin forma ni caracterización.

Uno de los tropes más usados, voluntaria o involuntariamente,  en las películas es el de The Smurfette Principle , aquel donde, tal como en la caricatura de The Smurfs, es común encontrar en un filme a un grupo de hombres protagonistas con una gran variedad de historias, y experiencias, masculinas por contar y solo a una mujer que los acompañe. Cuando este personaje tiene un papel principal, usualmente es relegada a ser interés amoroso, cuando no lo es, se reduce a un objeto que ayuda a avanzar la historia a algún lado.

Este trope surgió como respuesta práctica de Hollywood a la falta de personajes femeninos en sus películas. A final de cuentas, para ellos resulta mejor tener una “voz femenina” que funcione como depositario de todas las fantasías masculinas, que ninguna ¿no es así?

A lo largo de la historia ha existido una increíble variedad de Smurfettes que se han catapultado como intereses amorosos o motivaciones de nuestros protagonistas masculinos favoritos: Tess Ocean (Julia Roberts) existía en Ocean’s Eleven solo para fungir como interés amoroso y motivación personal de Danny Ocean, Henley Reeves (Isla Fisher) correspondía al avatar de la población femenina que buscaba representar Now You See Me , Lula May (Lizzy Caplan) tomó su lugar en Now You See Me 2 y Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) se convirtió en interés amoroso de Hulk en Avengers 2 de forma tan precipitada que ni siquiera el equipo creativo detrás de la película se molestó en crear una historia de fondo de valor para ella.

Tomando de nuevo el ejemplo de Justice League, Diana Prince también representa a esa Smurfette rodeada por un grupo de hombres, y cuyo fin es reducido en solo una escena cuando pasa de ser la líder del grupo a convertirse en un interés amoroso para Batman. Lois Lane y Martha Kent, por otro lado, son representadas como los objetos de deseo de Superman que lo motivan a ayudar al equipo y, por consecuencia, a avanzar la historia.

Existe también un tipo de escritura que intenta evitar usar a The Smurfette Principle en sus guiones:  agregar a 2 o más personajes femeninos en su historia. A simple vista, esta acción parece apuntar a querer mejorar la representación femenina en las historias, sin embargo, el problema radica en la forma en la que lo hacen.

Bajo el punto de vista masculino hegemónico los personajes femeninos solo pueden convivir en una historia de tres formas diferentes:  a) alejadas unas de las otras,  b) juntas pero discutiendo solo sobre sus contrapartes masculinas o c) siendo enemigas mortales.

Eleven y Max de Stranger Things son el mejor de ejemplo de la conjunción de estas tres variantes. A lo largo de la segunda temporada, los hermanos Duffer colocan a dichos personajes en puntos alejados donde pasan la mayor parte del tiempo sin conocerse y distanciadas la una de la otra. Eventualmente, las dos cruzan caminos, sin embargo, al hacerlo, crece una enemistad fuerte entre ellas debido a un malentendido y una disputa por Mike, el amigo más cercano de la segunda y el amor platónico de la primera.

Por ello, y muchas otras cosas, es que es importante contar con una variedad de perspectivas detrás de las historias que consumimos a diario y nosotros como audiencia podemos hacer mucho para que esto comience a suceder. Como primera instancia, podemos comenzar apoyar los filmes dirigidos y escritos por mujeres y cuestionar los que no.

Mi sugerencia es que, la próxima vez que veas una película, serie, videojuego o producto audiovisual de tus creadores masculinos favoritos, comienza a considerar las siguientes interrogativas: ¿La historia cuenta con más de un personaje femenino? ¿Las tomas se encargan de encuadrarla a ella de frente y enfocándose en su cara no en su cuerpo? ¿Hay más personajes femeninos que la acompañen? ¿Comparten escenas juntas? ¿Hablan entre ellas? ¿Son algo más que enemigas? ¿Discuten sobre algo más que no sean sus contrapartes masculinas?

Con esto en mente comenzaremos a exigir más de nuestros directores masculinos y daremos más espacios para las creadoras femeninas que tanto necesitamos en nuestro contexto actual.

*Atajo de storytelling que ayuda a la audiencia a entender algo instantáneamente.

Supergirl y la deconstrucción del estereotipo de la madre

Como lo he mencionado anteriormente, la representación de la figura materna en el cine y la televisión ha sido casi siempre relegada, y desplazada, a ser aquella mujer entregada a su familia y que no es capaz de entender su existencia como mujer separada de su posibilidad de ser madre. Para la sociedad que se refleja en estas historias, ser madre es la característica por antonomasia de la mujer.

Actualmente, pocas series han intentado (de)construir esta representación tanto como lo ha hecho Supergirl. Desde sus inicios, este programa ha retratado a sus personajes femeninos como mujeres fuertes, decididas, ambiciosas, libres y seguras de si mismas. Individuos capaces de tener una relación fuerte con otras mujeres sin necesidad de sentirse amenazadas.

En el universo de Supergirl las mujeres son mucho más que simples incubadoras de bebés; son líderes de compañías multinacionales, agentes encubiertos que trabajan para departamentos importantes del gobierno, reporteras incansables que siempre están en busca de la verdad, empresarias exitosas, reinas de civilizaciones, científicas que se preocupan por el medio ambiente y, por supuesto, superheroínas.

Lo que diferencia a estas mujeres del resto de las que existen en los programas de televisión actuales, es que algunas de ellas son también madres.  Las matriarcas de dicha serie no son reducidas ni relegadas debido a  su maternidad, al contrario, la maternidad no hace otra cosa que fortalecerlas. Ésta no se configura como su único rasgo identitario, sino que forma parte, más bien, de una serie de características y atributos que la constituyen como un ser humano completo.

De hecho la segunda temporada nos regala no sólo a una, sino a dos madres que figuran como la mayor amenaza de Supergirl: Lillian Luthor (Brenda Strong)  y Rhea (Teri Hatcher). Lillian es una científica, y fundadora del proyecto Cadmus, dispuesta a hacer todo por tratar de frenar la afluente — y a sus ojos, peligrosa—migración de extraterrestres a la tierra; también es la madre de Lex y Lena Luthor. Rhea, por otro lado, es la reina de los Daxamites, una civilización extraterrestre en constante batalla con los Kryptonian (la sociedad de donde proviene Kara ); también es la mamá de Mon-El, la pareja sentimental de Supergirl.

Ambas mujeres son líderes poderosas que están dispuestas a hacer todo para lograr sus metas, incluso manipular y chantajear a sus hijos de ser necesario. Mientras los planes de Lillian siempre involucran métodos peligrosos, y posiblemente terroristas, para deshacerse de los extraterrestres ilegales viviendo en la tierra, Rhea es capaz de cometer asesinatos en nombre de su civilización y con el fin de conquistar el planeta tierra.

Lo más interesante de estas dos figuras femeninas es que representan a la antítesis del estereotipo materno; las dos usan a sus hijos como medios para lograr sus planes y que, en caso de encontrarse en una situación de peligro, son capaces de deshacerse de ellos para salvarse así mismas. Tanto Lillian como Rhea apelan a su lado materno solo cuando necesitan verse más humanas y vulnerables frente a sus enemigos.

Con estos personajes los creadores de la serie logran subvertir por completo el estereotipo desgastado de la madre que hemos visto una y otra vez. Cada una usa su vulnerabilidad como fortaleza y respuesta ante una amenaza,  mientras que la a abnegación y entrega incondicional que se espera de ellas no es más que un obstáculo en medio de su camino.

Esta deconstrucción nos permite enfrentarnos a las ideas preconcebidas del imaginario de madre que reproducimos una y  y otra vez dentro de la sociedad.  Una mujer puede ser madre y una líder capaz de guiar un movimiento.  De la misma forma, también  puede elegir ser madre y dedicarse a ello de tiempo completo, cualquier alternativa es válida mientras exista la opción de tomar la decisión.

Lillian y Rhea no son solo madres, son mujeres poderosas que deciden separarse de la idea de maternidad  que la sociedad se aferra en establecer como aquella característica intrínseca de identidad que, en otra serie o situación, podría describirlas y reducirlas por completo.

Si hay algo que he aprendido de esta serie es que ser madre no es una obligación, es una decisión que cada mujer debería poder tomar con libertad, sin sentirse culpables y  sin necesidad de estar comprometidas a serlo,  solo por el simple hecho de tener un útero.

 

 

Rachel Bloom: musical comedy and spot on feminism

The day I fell in love with Rachel Bloom was actually the first time I ever heard anything from and about her. I was just  in the process of getting over my ex-boyfriend, so, naturally, I was looking for new music for my sad “I’m-over-you-and-I’m-not-sad-at-all” playlist to listen to on an infinite loop. I ran out of options quickly so, as any other lonely guy would do, I searched for songs with the word “dick” on their name and, without realizing, I was rapidly blasting “Pictures Of Your Dick”, by the one and only Rachel Bloom, non-stop. Little did I know that finding this merry tune will be just the tip of the iceberg on my quest to understand and embrace the numerous ways she navigates with her comedy.

For those who hadn’t had the joy of knowing Rachel Bloom, let me break it down for you. She is a comedian who started her career by doing musical comedy on Youtube (Please, don’t miss the opportunity to go to her channel to take a look of what’s she’s capable of) and now she’s the creator, writer and protagonist of The CW’s Crazy Ex-Girlfriend TV show, which recently was renewed for a third season.

She is a feminist who uses musical comedy to make a point and to take a stand on what she really believes in. So, in order to understand her comedy, you will need to see it as a criticism and a satire of the society’s actual state.

The clever ways she  balances her feminism in perfect unison with her comedy is, actually, her greatest statement of all; in fact, Rachel Bloom’s best asset is her particular way she uses the deconstruction of tropes, and social constructs, as strong arguments against sexism. Traditional gender roles and moral values are just some of the topics she likes to toy with on a daily basis.

Rachel Bloom sees society as a one big musical. A staging where the performers live by the narratives they taught themselves to believe in in order to follow the rules the script has laid upon them. A play where some tropes could be just as harmful as labels, but that can also be subverted in the same way.

You will only need to take one glimpse on her trajectory to find three subverted tropes that are present consistently on all the things she does: The Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, The Disney Princess and The Party Girl. Her most famous yet is, and thanks to her TV show, the Crazy Ex-Girlfriend.

This particular trope is pretty complex by itself, not only because it comes from a blatant sexist background, but because women are often labeled with it. You might have heard about this one before, it stems from the outdated idea that women are just emotional individuals that keep making rushed choices with their heart and not with their minds. So, by acting on it, they will always be reduced to this one-note characters that will probably be obsessed with the dudes they had a relationship with.

Rachel Bloom, on the other hand, makes the most of it by really going along with it. She constantly mocks this particular trope by going the extra mile by granting all these particular characteristics to her main character of the show, Rebecca Bunch (played, obviously, by her): she basically moves to her ex-boyfriend’s hometown in order to get back with him, but she’s convinced that that’s not the reason she changed cities.

Rebecca is obsessive, irrational and stubborn. She’s the best caricature of the trope we can get. That’s what’s really enthralling of the show, her character is so exaggerated and over the top that it becomes really easy to deconstruct it in order to identify the flaws behind it. That’s how Rachel Bloom rolls, by exaggerating the stereotype and waiting for the cracks to show.

Her Crazy Ex-Girlfriends are often saying to themselves, and to others, what men would like to hear in order to get back with them, after all, they are hopelessly in love and  very devoted to the man they love. It’s common that they have a really low self-esteem and their personality, and core identity, varies from man to man. They even upload pictures of their ex-boyfriend’s dick online as a form of personal vendetta.

With only two seasons of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend in, we are able to understand, as the audience, that women that are labeled as the Crazy Ex-Girlfriend are, in fact, often constrained by all the high and sexist standards that society have placed on them from the very beginning.  In a certain way, they just acts on it.

Women have to be sentimental — and not tough—, because the gender role they have to fulfill demands them to be like that, but only in small doses and without being too loud, because, without any kind of supervision, it could probably transform into an obsession or, even worst, a direct attack against our very fragile masculinity.

The Disney Princess trope comes right from the same place. Society will always tell us that, in order to have a happy life, women have to become wives, not Crazy Ex-Girlfriends,  and the best way to do it is by drawing the attention of a Prince Charming by being feminine, elegant, selfless and sentimental. That’s why Rachel Bloom’s subversion of this trope is so delicious. Her Princesses are everything but what society likes to call “ladylike”. They like to curse while their sing, and they will certainly talk about poop and menstrual cramps without any decorum. They are, at the end of the day, regular human beings, not impossible standards to achieve.

The Party Girl has her origins on the darkest corner of masculine heterosexuality: the fantasies. This stereotype wants women to be sexy, sensual and carefree but without losing any trace of femininity and elegance. This particular trope can be very contradictory by itself. It asks women to be kind of slutty but without losing their pristine image or any respect from the others, especially from herself. You can also find this girl in any party waiting to woo over some random dudes.

In Rachel Bloom’s world, the Party Girl sings at the club about dying from cancer, throwing up a bile, threatening someone’s girlfriend to kill her and use her skin as a dress, or even flying her dirty panties as a kite, all of that whilst using a revealing outfit. As you can see, she’s anything but sexy.

This is what we really need right now, someone who is willing to use her platform to make strong statements about important topics visible,  with creative methods that can help people understand them in a more accesible way. Rachel Bloom is already getting ahead of everybody.

Big Little Lies, 13 Reasons Why y Sweet/Vicious: La voz de las víctimas de la violencia de género

La violencia de género es y sigue siendo un problema que nos sigue afectando a todos y a todas. Tan solo con ver que en 2016 se registraron 29,725 averiguaciones y carpetas de investigación por delitos sexuales en México, esto significa que, en promedio, en ese año, cada 24 horas se denunciaron 81 nuevos casos de violencia sexual, es decir, entre 3 y 4 violaciones o abusos sexuales por hora. Actualmente, siete mujeres son asesinadas al día en México y hace poco, a una chica que murió en un accidente vial se le tachaba de puta por subirse a un carro de un hombre desconocido sin que su esposo la estuviera acompañando.

Como sociedad estamos muy acostumbrados a enterarnos de hechos como estos —o incluso presenciar actos de abuso sexual— sin inmutarnos, ni hacer nada al respecto. Es por eso que es de vital importancia hablar sobre ello, mantenernos informados y no quitar el dedo del renglón. Hay una línea muy delgada que separa a la normalización de la violencia de género de la visibilización de la misma y todos los días, como sociedad, estamos dispuestos a cruzarla.

Como lo he comentado anteriormente, la representación es importante y si hay algo que (la mayoría de) los programas de televisión han logrado hacer estos últimos años es, precisamente, contar historias y narrativas que visibilicen no sólo a problemas como estos, sino la razón detrás de ellos. A final de cuentas, es siempre el contexto el que nos delimita y posiciona frente a lo que buscamos entender.

Shows como Big Little Lies , 13 Reasons Why Sweet/Vicious son producto y resultado directo de la cultura de la violencia de género que es tan próspera en nuestra sociedad actual. En ellas, se representan a las relaciones de poder unilaterales como aquella causa inherente de la violencia de género gracias a una variedad de historias protagonizadas por mujeres que son violentadas, sometidas a situaciones de abuso y llevadas al límite.

Las relaciones de poder, y la enorme influencia que puede tener una persona sobre la voluntad de otra, es la idea central que rige las historias y los arcos principales de las mismas. Gracias a la representación tan detallada del proceso complicado que dos personas atraviesan para formar una relación de poder, y el intercambio simbólico que esto conlleva, se logra la visibilización de un problema normalizado.

Lo que en cualquier otro tipo de serie pudo haber sido aprovechado como un momento perfecto para hacer uso del shock value, en estos programas de televisión es tratado a fondo, representando con suma claridad una variedad de temáticas que muy pocas series se han atrevido a tocar, como las consecuencias del abuso sexual, las razones detrás del acoso, los alcances de la sociedad misógina y las repercusiones de la normalización de la violencia de género.

En Big Little Lies, Celeste Wright (Nicole Kidman) vive una relación de abuso con su esposo Perry (Alexander Skarsgard), donde la pasión que sienten el uno por el otro los mantiene unidos pero, al mismo tiempo, es siempre el origen de un maltrato físico y emocional que él le ocasiona a ella. La serie no toma reparo en mostrar, a lo largo de sus ocho capítulos, los actos violentos por los que ella tiene que pasar. Con cada grito y cada golpe, Celeste se asegura así misma que Perry no le inflige dolor a propósito, que es algo que él no puede controlar y que ella está ahí para apoyarlo. Ella sabe que vive en una relación de abuso y que, por el bien de sus hijos, debería alejarse de su esposo, sin embargo, no puede olvidar todo lo que su esposo significa para ella.

En el mismo programa aparece Jane Chapman (Shailene Woodley), una chica que decide mudarse de ciudad para comenzar de nuevo y, de paso, buscar al hombre desconocido que la violó unos años atrás y que también es padre de su hijo. A lo largo de los 8 capítulos podemos ver, a través de sus ojos, lo que es vivir después de haber sobrevivido a un acto de violencia de género. Jane tiene pesadillas y se encuentra en un estado de pánico constante a consecuencia de ello. La vida de Jane ya no es de ella después de aquel acto violento.

Lo que estos shows nos ayudan a entender es que los casos de abuso sexual no son situaciones ni momentos aislados que suceden de la nada; ni mucho menos son causados por la víctima. Al contrario, se trata más bien de la culminación de una cadena de sucesos agresivos, infligidos por una persona o grupos de personas, que son normalizados con naturaleza por una sociedad donde la violencia de género es parte del día a día.

Hannah Baker (Katherine Langford) es una adolescente que tiene que soportar las acciones escabrosas detrás de la cultura misógina en la que vive en 13 Reasons Why. Este programa de Netflix aprovecha los beneficios del binge-watching, que su plataforma facilita, para representar con lujo de detalle los procesos involucrados en la cultura normalizada de la violencia de género. Desde su perspectiva podemos entender cómo las mujeres son cosificadas desde la adolescencia y, por ello, se convierten instantáneamente en un objetivo fácil para aquellos que deciden que, por el simple hecho de ser mujeres, sus cuerpos le pertenecen a los hombres y tienen el derecho de hacer con ellos lo que quieran. Hannah es violada días después de que le sucede lo mismo a su mejor amiga Jessica, por su compañero de clases con el pretexto de que ellas nunca se negaron.

Jules Thomas (Eliza Bennett), al igual que Celeste, Hannah, Jessica y Jane, es una sobreviviente de un abuso sexual perpetrado por el novio de su mejor amiga mientras ella estaba inconsciente en Sweet/Vicious. El giro de esta serie radica en el posicionamiento de Jules como una vigilante que busca venganza al golpear a hombres acusados de violencia sexual. El show no solo se encarga de darle voz a una víctima, sino que también le da agencia y autonomía al proporcionarle los medios para pelear en contra de la misma sociedad que permitió a su agresor aprovecharse de ella.

La existencia de estas series importa mucho. Estos son programas que colocan a las víctimas de abuso sexual como personas con voz, agencia y autonomía, son shows que no se detienen a la hora de confrontar al espectador con escenas de agresión sexual y que no solo ayudan a entender los alcances que tiene la violencia de género en nuestro día a día, sino que también nos permiten identificarlos en nosotros mismos y en los demás.